Stricter Pell Grant rules raise standards for ‘satisfactory academic progress’

by Grace

Under the new rules, students lose their eligibility for aid such as Pell Grants if they’re on academic probation for more than one semester and do not file a successful appeal. The previous limit was two semesters. This is on top of the existing SAP requirements: a cumulative GPA of at least 2.0, successful completion of a certain percent (usually 67 percent) of classes attempted, and completion of no more than 150 of the number of hours required for a credential.

This seems fair.   (Until it’s my child who’s failing . . .)

These standards also apply to other types of federal financial aid.
… 

New Pell rules cut off failing students

Federal Student Aid:  Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP)

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4 Comments to “Stricter Pell Grant rules raise standards for ‘satisfactory academic progress’”

  1. Yes, at the very least.

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  2. Uh these rules sound good on the surface but in practice are bullshit. I’m loosing my Pell grant under the 150% time limit because the rules make the schools include my entire academic record in the calculation. So the classes I enrolled in and paid for from ’88 to ’94 count against the program I am in now that I started in fall of 2010. With a 3.6 GPA and only one dropped class since starting back at this school I’d like to know what I could have done to loose the grant.

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  3. Unfortunately, it sounds as if you’ve run into the “completion of no more than 150 of the number of hours required for a credential”. Even though you did not use Pell Grants for those previous credits, they disqualify you from receiving Pell Grants now.

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  4. “Unfortunately, it sounds as if you’ve run into the “completion of no more than 150 of the number of hours required for a credential”. Even though you did not use Pell Grants for those previous credits, they disqualify you from receiving Pell Grants now.”

    If you haven’t already used a Pell Grant, that does sound very unfair, particularly for such old coursework.

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