‘jobs that pay the most for the least amount of work’

by Grace

Have I got your attention?

After reviewing data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 24/7 Wall St. identified jobs that pay the most for the least amount of work. Most of these positions still require a great deal of training, but once completed, the amount of work drops significantly.


Highest Paying Jobs With The Most Time Off

If you’re looking for a comfortable lifestyle that offers a reasonable work-life balance, maybe you should be looking at careers like these.

Via TaxProfBlog

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11 Comments to “‘jobs that pay the most for the least amount of work’”

  1. I would really like to know how they got these statistics. Did they account for part-timers? Many SLPs, OTs, and librarians work part-time by choice – that would really affect these statistics. And what is a post secondary law teacher? If they mean law professors, then something is highly screwed up with their statistics. All the law professors I know kill themselves. They have to have lengthy publication records for tenure, and usually are expected to maintain a law practice as well.

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  2. It appears they did take into account part-timers, as well as the reduced work hours of those who work in schools. They pointed out that many of these therapists work by appointment, which results in overall lower number of hours worked. I think that’s a fair way to report this, especially since most are are working part time by choice.

    At the TaxProfBlog link, there are suggestions that for law professors salaries are actually understated and hours are overstated. Hmm . . . different perspectives

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  3. A friend mentioned how excited she was about an upcoming sabbatical, a common benefit among academics and also mentioned in the article. When you average in the time off of sabbaticals and other time off that academics enjoy, I can see how it works to lower the average weekly hours worked.

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  4. Grace, a sabbatical is not time off. You are expected to have grant funding, and a research project. Often, a sabbatical entails working at a university or institute in another area. You are also expected to publish papers based on your sabbatical project. I have never worked at a school with sabbaticals, but my father always worked very hard during his sabbaticals.

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  5. Although work is expected during a sabbatical, it appears the author and others consider that time to be a reduced schedule of sorts. Perhaps there is a view that sabbatical work is more “personal” than teaching and administrative duties. I don’t really know, not having first-hand experience with the concept.

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  6. In thinking about this a little more, it occurs to me that outsiders might view sabbaticals as similar to employees going for advanced degrees, sometimes subsidized by the employer. It’s work and it relates to their employment, but it’s not considered part of their “working hours”.

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  7. Generally in industry, if you are being sent to fulltime training programs, it is counted as part of your working hours. A sabbatical is not something you do after-hours on a part-time basis. It is part of the job. At elite universities and colleges, where the eliteness factor is part of marketing, administrators really care about the number of Fulbright awards, or faculty who spend time at Oxford or NASA, or who do stints at government think tanks. One of the big purposes of sabbaticals is to encourage ties with other elite institutions and government. At less elite schools, the hope is to build associations with more elite schools. Even at my school, we constantly get pressure to apply for Fulbrights.

    So in some sense, this is more like the execs who constantly travel to exotic locations to schmooze with customers. We count that as part of their working hours for sure.

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  8. In my previous comment was referring to degreed programs, not industry training programs. In my experience, no one ever counted working on degreed programs in their working hours. But I know in some cases employees are allowed time-off to go to class.

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  9. But when you are on sabbatical, you are not getting some amount of time off to go get a degree. You are working fulltime on a project that the university has deemed to somehow advance their mission (remember, projects have to be approved at most schools). One can debate whether these projects actually advance the mission, but most research oriented universities seem to believe this is useful. Sabbaticals are part of the normal, expected workload at research universities, and many elite liberal arts colleges.

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  10. I’m talking about perceptions. Other lines of work don’t have sabbaticals, so it’s hard to relate to exactly what they mean. Being excused from your “regular” job duties while working full-time on a project that benefits you (and intended to benefit the employer) sounds a lot like being subsidized to work on an advanced degree. I’m not saying they’re the same, but they might be perceived as such.

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  11. Another analog is Google’s 20% rule – they expect their engineers to spend 20% of their time on personal projects.The projects range from traditional software projects, to educational projects (outreach to K12 is big) to humanitarian projects. When we worked with the guy at Google this summer, we were working on apps for volunteer firefighters – part of his 20% effort. Google considers that 20% to be part of the employee’s normal workload, because they see payoff from a lot of these projects, either in the form of technology, or in the form of an increase in prestige and visibility. To me, that is much closer to the sabbatical idea. IBM Research also does some similar things.On a smaller scale, it is very common for big companies to pay expenses to send people to conferences and workshops that are not training or project-related, just to increase the visibility of the company, generate some good will, and encourage schmoozing. People sent to these conferences, even in fun places, definitely consider themselves to be working. For example, lots of companies send their people to the big Grace Hopper conference on women in computing, so they can increase their visibility. That is pretty much the same idea behind sabbaticals – increase the prestige and visibility of the university, and make it more likely they will get that all-important grant funding later on.

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