Distracted by digital devices

by Grace
A survey of 500 college students has found that 67 percent can’t go more than an hour without using some sort of digital technology, and that 40 percent can’t go more than 10 minutes. The independently conducted survey was prepared for CourseSmart, which sells e-textbooks on behalf of leading publishers. The survey found that students today are more likely to bring a laptop to class than to bring a textbook.
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Ugh, but aren’t many of us older folks in the same boat?  I was attending a live music event last week, but I noticed both my husband and I each felt compelled to check our smartphones a few times during the hour-long performance.


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11 Comments to “Distracted by digital devices”

  1. Textbook? What’s a textbook? Remember, my students won’t bring pencil and paper to class.

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  2. This simply stuns me, but I’m sure your experience is common.

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  3. “Remember, my students won’t bring pencil and paper to class.”

    Oh dear. Maybe that needs to be a daily assignment?

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  4. I’ve seen it’s not uncommon for high school teachers to give “special assignments” to help students get a higher grade, in some cases to help them pass the course.

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  5. It’s official–too many students are going to college.

    Bonnie, are you at a CC, a state college, or a private college?

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  6. It just occurred to me that the no-paper-no-pencil thing is the sort of complaint you used to hear from inner city teachers. It’s really sad to think that it’s moved into higher education.

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  7. I am at a largeish private Catholic university, one with admissions standards. Believe it or not, we reject applicants!

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  8. There’s a very good thread going over at Joanne Jacobs’ blog on the problem of the entitled student.

    http://www.joannejacobs.com/2012/05/the-entitled-student/

    I’m thinking that the problems of high tuition, big loans, the diminishing value of a bachelor’s degree and the entitled student may be closely interrelated. It may be that there is a particular profile of college student (marginally qualified and putting in minimal effort) who is likely 1) to wind up with big loans and 2) to get very little educational benefit from their time in college.

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  9. I agree, Amy. That’s a GREAT thread, encapsulating so many of the issues of the higher education bubble without ever mentioning student loans and rising costs of college. And many of the problems start in K-12. (Written as I’m also thinking how to help a certain high school student find a way to incorporate historical figures into a rap song, which constitutes the largest part of the history class capstone project. Some other choices were to make items for a history time capsule or draw a comic strip. College prep ain’t what it used to be, but college isn’t either.)

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  10. “Written as I’m also thinking how to help a certain high school student find a way to incorporate historical figures into a rap song, which constitutes the largest part of the history class capstone project.”

    Oh my goodness.

    By the way, I remember years ago reading about how in countries like Japan, it’s really difficult to get into a good college and students kill themselves with study before college, but once they get there, they kick back and don’t have to work. The author was contrasting this with the US system of the time, where there isn’t as much pressure with regard to college entrance, but college students actually work and learn stuff. You can see how our educational system may be evolving (or have evolved) in the very same direction–high pressure in K-12 with regard to college admissions, followed by a 4-7 year vacation.

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  11. Oh yes, I hear all the time about how much more difficult it is to GET into college than it is to do well in college. “4-7 year vacation” lol!

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