Some career advice is timeless, and some is only recently relevant

by Grace

Successful entrepreneur Jason Nazar has some advice for 20-year-olds.

… Call me a curmudgeon, but at 34, how I came up seems so different from what this millennial generation expects.  I made a lot of mistakes along the way, and I see this generation making their own….

Some of Nazar’s suggestions have been around for many years, while others are new and relevant to the current business environment.  Here are a few from his list of “20 Things 20-Year-Olds Don’t Get .

When it comes to communication, young people seem to prefer texting and email over talking.  But sometimes a personal touch makes a difference, and the sound of your voice can be important.

Pick Up the Phone – Stop hiding behind your computer. Business gets done on the phone and in person.  It should be your first instinct, not last, to talk to a real person and source business opportunities.  And when the Internet goes down… stop looking so befuddled and don’t ask to go home.  Don’t be a pansy, pick up the phone.

When you’re new on the job, working hard is a must.  Maybe there will be time later on to coast, or maybe not.

Be the First In & Last to Leave ­– I give this advice to everyone starting a new job or still in the formative stages of their professional career.  You have more ground to make up than everyone else around you, and you do have something to prove.  There’s only one sure-fire way to get ahead, and that’s to work harder than all of your peers.

Nobody wants the challenge of managing an employee who lacks initiative and needs to be told what to do.

Don’t Wait to Be Told What to Do – You can’t have a sense of entitlement without a sense of responsibility.  You’ll never get ahead by waiting for someone to tell you what to do.  Saying “nobody asked me to do this” is a guaranteed recipe for failure.  Err on the side of doing too much, not too little.

This one caught me a little by surprise since I have sometimes found myself buying  into the idea that social media ranks highest in what makes a company successful.

Social Media is Not a Career – These job titles won’t exist in 5 years. Social media is simply a function of marketing; it helps support branding, ROI or both.  Social media is a means to get more awareness, more users or more revenue.  It’s not an end in itself.  I’d strongly caution against pegging your career trajectory solely to a social media job title.

If I thought they would take heed, I would send this list to some young people I know.  It’s mainly good advice.

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