The jobless recovery in one chart

by Grace

An illustration of our jobless recovery from economics professor Mark J. Perry

20140909.COCJoblessRecoveryChart1

 

Bottom Line: The US has been producing new record-high levels of GDP in almost every quarter since Q3 2011, and we are now producing 7.65% (and $1.14 trillion) more real GDP today than in late 2007. But we are producing that record-setting level of real output with a quarter-million fewer workers than in 2007. One explanation for America’s record-high output with 227,000 fewer workers is that the Great Recession facilitated what might be one of the greatest expansions of worker productivity in US history. The fact that we’ve been able to greatly expand national output with fewer inputs (workers) represents a huge increase in economic efficiency, but has also left us with a lingering “jobless recovery” and an economy that is struggling to create new, post-recession employment opportunities for millions of Americans.

Labor force participation remains low.

Perry explains that he is using the “more comprehensive measure of total civilian employment” instead of the total payroll number, which recently climbed up to pre-recession levels  However, his bigger point is supported by the troubling increase in the working age population during that time.

As good as that might sound, surpassing the previous high-water mark in terms of payroll employment is cold comfort for recent graduates and other new entrants into the work force, as well as for the legions of Americans who lost their jobs in the Great Recession. While payrolls may be back to where they were before the downturn, the working age population has risen by roughly 15 million over the same period.

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Mark J. Perry, “The current state of the US economy in one chart”, Carpe Diem, September 5, 2014.

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