Archive for ‘applying to college’

May 8, 2015

Rolling admissions can relieve college application stress

by Grace

For high school seniors, it can be comforting to be able to secure admission to a good school early on in application season.  It reduces the stress during the months of applying and waiting for decisions from other colleges.  For this reason, high-achieving students should consider applying to “High-Ranking Schools With Rolling Admissions”.

  • Pennsylvania State University—University Park
  • University of Pittsburgh
  • Purdue University—West Lafayette (IN)
  • Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey—New Brunswick
  • University of Minnesota—Twin Cities
  • SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry
  • Indiana University—Bloomington
  • Michigan State University
  • University of Tulsa (OK)
  • University of Alabama
  • Stony Brook University—SUNY
  • Binghamton University—SUNY

Rolling admissions are often offered by large state universities.  Students can apply in the fall, sometimes as early as September, and receive word within a few weeks.

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Delece Smith-Barrow, “High-Ranking Schools With Rolling Admissions”, U.S. News & World Report, Nov. 6, 2014.

April 29, 2015

Estimating income tax information for early FAFSA filing

by Grace

It’s best to file your FAFSA early because colleges may run out of financial aid funds for later applicants.  But filing early often means that income tax information must be estimated and then later corrected.

Estimating your income may be a simple matter of using the previous year’s number and adjusting slightly.  Or, if your financial circumstances have changed considerably it may require more work.  FAFSA has an income estimator on their site that may be helpful.

After income taxes are filed, you must submit corrected information to FAFSA.  In most cases, you can use their IRS Data Retrieval Tool for a relatively painless process.  Otherwise, the process is more time-consuming because you will need to request that a copy of your tax return be sent to your school.

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 Alexandra Rice, “Taxes and the FAFSA: What You Need to Know”, U.S. News & World Report, March 30, 2015.

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April 8, 2015

How to ask for more college financial aid

by Grace

College financial aid letters have just been sent, and you may want to think about how to negotiate for more money.

Many families don’t realize it, but there is often a little wiggle room in financial aid awards. FAFSA, the form the government and colleges use to determine need- and some merit-based aid, doesn’t capture all circumstances that might affect a family’s ability to pay for school. For instance, there’s no line to include the cost of caring for an elderly parent or special needs child, the kind of expenses that could warrant more aid, said Mark Kantrowitz, publisher of Edvisors.com, a college planning Web site. So if you weren’t able to share that kind of information with the school, now is the time to bring it up to see if that shakes free some more assistance.

You can request a professional judgement review.

If you do decide to negotiate, you can appeal to the school’s financial aid administrator for what’s known as a professional judgment review. Gather up every piece of documentation of any changes to your family finances or special circumstances that could impact your ability to pay for school. If the financial impact is significant enough, the school may adjust your child’s award.

Don’t attempt to haggle.

“Colleges are not car dealerships, where bluff and bluster can get you a better deal. Very few colleges will make a revised financial aid offer when a student gets a more generous financial aid offer from a competitor,” he said.

But some schools, like Cornell and Carnegie Mellon, will consider matching offers of peer institutions.

You “should be careful in the language and manner” of your approach.

“We won’t ‘negotiate,’ but we might ‘review.”

Looking for more tips?  “Want to appeal your college financial aid? Go for it”

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Danielle Douglas-Gabriel, “How to negotiate a better financial aid package”, Washington Post, April 2, 2015.

January 19, 2015

Completing the FAFSA

by Grace

Students and parents often find the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) to be a little intimidating. The form asks more than 100 questions about family finances and demographic details. The FAFSA is slightly more complicated than the typical federal income tax return. Officially, the form should take less than an hour to complete, but most parents don’t have advanced degrees in economics. Some parents want help completing the FAFSA, because they worry that making a mistake on the FAFSA will affect their ability to pay for college, ruining their child’s life forever.

Don’t panic! Take a deep breath. Relax.

Edvisors offers an online Step-by-Step FAFSA Tutorial

… This step-by-step guide provides a tutorial overview of completing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). It is based on the bestselling book, Filing the FAFSA.

The book is available for free download at the link.

The Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis offers a video that guides you through completing the FAFSA.

FAFSA 101
Take a stroll through each screen of the online FAFSA to see what information you’ll need on hand to complete the application quickly and accurately.

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November 17, 2014

The value of A.P. classes

by Grace

The New York Times Motherlode blog asks the question, “To A.P. or Not to A.P”?

Students, parents, and school administrators have mixed feelings about A.P. classes.  Students sometimes feel pressured to take these advanced courses even when it’s not appropriate, but in many cases taking at least a few A.P. courses is the right decision.

When taught well, A.P. and I.B. courses can offer high school students the opportunity to study college-level material while in high school. Administrators and teachers may be divided on the merits of offering A.P. courses, but they agree that secondary schools feel pressure to offer them to appear academically rigorous.

A.P. courses usually look good on college applications.  Selective colleges want to know if students have taken the “the most rigorous academic program available”, so the natural inclination is to take as many A.P. classes as possible.  While some experts advise students that more is not necessarily better, it’s hard to believe that in a competitive situation more high A.P. scores will not add points on a college application.

… “Selective colleges make it clear these days that they will not consider candidates that have not done AP or IB.”…

Students and parents often blame the Ivy League and other selective colleges for perpetuating the current cutthroat environment, insofar as such schools advise taking “the most rigorous academic program available” (as stated on the University of Virginia’s admissions website).

“What parents are saying is that ‘until colleges change their message, I’m not going to let my kid be the sacrificial lamb,’ ” Pope observes.

But colleges say it’s the literal interpretation of this advice that gets students into trouble.

“What admission officers almost always say…is focus on what lights your fire and take advantage of the most challenging offerings in those areas,” urges NACAC’s Hawkins. “That’s a very different message from, ‘Take all of the AP classes.’ ”…

Why take A.P. courses?

A.P. courses can be the appropriately challenging level of study for advanced students, and a way to avoid being bored in classes that are too easy.

Students can earn college credit for A.P. courses when test scores are above a certain level.  This can save money and time, even enable graduation in less than four years.

In some cases colleges do not give credit, but use A.P. test scores to allow a student to skip over introductory classes.  This can be a benefit, but in some cases students should still take the lower-level college class.  For example, a STEM major may wish to take the college calculus course as a way to establish a stronger foundation for advanced course work.

Why avoid A.P. courses?

For some students, A.P. classes add excessive stress, either because of the extra work involved or because the student is not prepared to perform at the higher level.  In these cases, the lower-level course is the more appropriate placement.

There are borderline cases, where the question is whether it’s better to get an A in a regular college prep course or a lower grade in an A.P. course.

The answer that most colleges will give you is that, it’s better to get an A in the Honors/AP class.  Well, of course.  And most highly selective colleges will expect that you do.  But in reality, most colleges would rather see a B in an Honors or AP course.  They want to see that you are truly challenging yourself, but that you are still mastering the material….

The decision to take or skip A.P. courses is not always easy.  Consider it carefully.

ADDED:  Gas station without pumps blog gives commentary and advice on How many AP courses are too many?

Probably the most reasonable course is for students to take AP courses (and exams!) in those subjects that most interest them and pursue interests outside the AP classroom. Community college courses that go beyond the AP courses are also a cost-effective choice, if you can get in.

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Jessica Lahey, “To A.P. or Not to A.P., That Is the Question”, New York Times, November 13, 2014.

Amy Brecount White, “Under Pressure”, Arlington Magazine, September-October 2014.

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November 13, 2014

A reminder to look at net costs when comparing colleges

by Grace

Families should look at the net costs, after financial aid of all types, when assessing potential colleges.

Parents comparing college costs would be doing themselves and their kids a huge disservice if they just pay attention to listed tuition prices. What really matters is how much the school will cost you after financial aid and outside scholarships. And frankly some schools offer more scholarships than others….

Reyna Gobel offers a three-step method for getting started on a college list.

1. Have your son or daughter gather a list of 10 schools they’re interested in attending….

2. Use the net price calculators on each school’s website….

3. Talk to the high school counselor for your teen….

Net price calculators are imperfect estimators, so be aware of the cases where they are more likely to produce inaccurate results.

Related:  Are you eligible for a college tuition discount?

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Reyna Gobel, “Why Applying to Schools Based on Tuition Prices Can Cost Families Money”, Forbes, 8/31/2014.

November 6, 2014

What’s the hardest part about applying to college?

by Grace

No surprise here.  Students think the standardized tests are the hardest part about applying for college, but parents seem more focused on the challenge of paying for college.

 

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Other survey results can be found at “College by the Numbers, A Statistical Look at College Costs, Financial Aid and More”.

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Christina Lourosa-Richardo, “College by the Numbers”, Wall Street Journal, Sept. 21, 2014.

October 16, 2014

It’s surprisingly hard for residents to get into some state universities

by Grace

Many in-state colleges and universities are accepting fewer in-state applicants into their freshman classes. Why?

The Wall Street Journal has a short video that gives the example of a California high school valedictorian with top Advanced Placement scores and an overall impressive resume (quarterback for his football team).  This student was rejected at two public schools in his home state — UC Berkeley and UCLA.  But he was accepted to an Ivy League University.

In many public universities and colleges in-state enrollment is declining and out-of-state enrollment is increasing.

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20141014.COCIncreasingOutofstateEnrollment2

 

Colleges want students who ‘can pay full price’

To make up for budget shortfalls, state schools are actively seeking out-of-state and international students who will pay higher tuition than in-state students.  In some states, limitations on out-of-state students place restrictions on an institution’s desire for higher revenues.  Last time I checked, out-of-state students allowed in the UC system are capped at 10%.

California presents a particular challenge for many students because “residents must adhere to very specific requirements to gain admission” to the University of California system”.  UC Berkeley, UCLA, and UC Irvine are considered the most selective public schools in that state, but it surprises me that the student featured in the video did not get in.

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October 9, 2014

Colleges want students who ‘can pay full price’

by Grace

Here’s a sobering reminder for students working on their college applications now.  It’s number 8 on the list of “10 things the college admissions office won’t tell you”.

We’d rather admit someone who can pay full price

All other things being equal, a full pay student often has a better chance of admission than a student who needs financial aid.

According to the College Board, 10% of college freshmen in 2013 were foreign students. One reason colleges woo these international scholars: Many are wealthy enough to pay the full price of tuition.

At publicly funded state universities, higher tuition for out-of-state students often helps subsidize education for state residents. For example, for an undergraduate at the University of California at Berkeley, in-state tuition is about $13,000 a year; for an out-of-state or foreign student, tuition is about $36,000 a year.

Full pay can be an admissions boost for marginal students.

The interest in full-pay students is so strong that 10 percent of four-year colleges report that the full-pay students they are admitting have lower grades and test scores than do other admitted applicants.

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Daniel Goldstein, “10 things the college admissions office won’t tell you”, MarketWatch, Oct 4, 2014.

September 12, 2014

Are African immigrants taking up college spots intended for African-Americans?

by Grace

African immigrants are over-represented at elite colleges compared to non-immigrant African-Americans.  Colleges probably don’t care as long as they can use immigrants to show how diverse their student body is.

… A 2007 study covered by the Washington Post found that a quarter of black students admitted to elite colleges were African immigrants, though they only represented 13 percent of America’s college-age black population. The study’s authors several theories on why black immigrants do better, including “to white observers black immigrants seem more polite, less hostile, more solicitous and ‘easier to get along with.’ Native blacks are perceived in precisely the opposite fashion.”

Immigrants did not experience the “stigma” felt by African-American black children.

Lani Guinier, a Harvard professor, argued instead that schools were attempting to “resolve historic wrongs against native black Americans by enrolling immigrants who look like them” but had different experiences. “In part, it has to do with coming from a country … where blacks were in the majority and did not experience the stigma that black children did in the United States,” Guinier said. Either explanation creates a divide — as if Africans can only succeed at the expense of black Americans, or vice versa.

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Arit John, “Why the All-Ivy League Story Stirs Up Tensions Between African Immigrants and Black Americans”, The Wire, April 1, 2014.

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