Posts tagged ‘delayed adolescence’

May 25, 2015

Half of college graduates expect continued financial support from parents

by Grace

Parents of college grads have lower expectations for their adult children’s ability to support themselves.

… Some 36% of parents say they expected to support their children financially for more than two years, up from just 18% last year, and only 2.8% of parents expect their kids to have a full-time job after college and only one-quarter see them having any kind of job in their chosen field when they graduate….

Their kids are even more pessimistic.

About half of students expect to be supported financially by their parents for up to two years after graduation, according to a new survey of 500 students and 500 parents released Tuesday by Upromise, the savings division of Sallie Mae, the student lender….

Agreement about the “new normal”.

Both students and their parents are more accepting of the new normal, says Erin Condon, president of Upromise by Sallie Mae. “We were pleasantly surprised that parents and students were very aligned in their expectations,” she says. “One could argue that this generation is entitled or spoiled, but you could always argue that they are financially responsible and not biting off more than they can chew by making effort to get off on the right foot to make sure that long-term success is there.”

Related:  “Baby Boomers’ kids are doing worse than their parents”

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Quentin Fottrell, “Half of college graduates expect to be supported by their families”, MarketWatch, May 19, 2015.

August 1, 2014

What stresses teens the most?

by Grace

US teenagers feel more stressed than adults

27 percent of teenagers reported feeling “extreme stress” during the school year, compared to 20 percent of adults.

It should be no surprise that school-related matters are the most common sources of stress for teenagers.

For teens, the most commonly reported sources of stress are school (83 percent), getting into a good college or deciding what to do after high school (69 percent), and financial concerns for their family (65 percent).

Millenials are the most likely to overeat due to stress

Millennials are more likely than other generations to say they eat too much or eat unhealthy foods due to stress — 50 percent say they have done so in the past month, compared to 36 percent of Gen Xers, 36 percent of Boomers and 19 percent of Matures.5 Millennials are also most likely to say they ate unhealthy foods or overate because of a food craving (62 percent vs. 52 percent of Gen Xers and 53 percent of Boomers).

As we become older we learn better ways to handle stress.

Have US teens always felt more stressed than adults, or is this a recent development?

I suspect that older people have always been better at managing stress.  But today’s “delayed adolescence”, with its postponement of the age when young adults assume primary responsibility for self-sufficiency, may be a reason for a reduced ability to manage stress successfully.  One source of stress that has grown for teens is the complex process of planning and paying for college.  Other past sources of  stress like dangerous industrial working conditions are no longer a problem.  If I had to choose, I would select college planning as my worst problem over many others that adolescents have faced in previous years.

Related:  “‘Every 20-something I know is in therapy for something’” (Cost of College)

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American Psychological Association, Stress in America, February 11, 2014.

April 2, 2013

Average amount of parents’ contribution to college is about $10,000

by Grace

What is the average amount of money provided by parents who contribute to their children’s college education?

Nearly 35 percent of young adults said their parents helped with college tuition, with those receiving help given an average of $10,147;

This comes from a University of Michigan study by Patrick Wightman and Robert Schoeni of the U-M National Poverty Center and Keith Robinson of the University of Texas at Austin.

More than 60% of young adults ages 19-22 received some type of financial help from their parents, averaging about $7,500 a year.  Children are taking longer to become “adults”.

“Young people in the U.S. are taking longer to leave home, finish their schooling, get stable jobs, get married, and have children,” says Wightman, who is the MacArthur Network on Transitions to Adulthood research fellow at the Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy at U-M.  “And the slow transition to traditional adult roles has been accompanied by an increase in the financial support young adults receive from their parents.”

How parents help:

  • About 42 percent of respondents reported their parents helped them pay bills, with those receiving help getting an average of $1,741;
  • Nearly 35 percent of young adults said their parents helped with college tuition, with those receiving help given an average of $10,147;
  • About 23 percent received help with vehicles (about $9,682 on average);
  • About 22 percent received help with their rent away from home ($3,937 on average);
  • About 11 percent said they received loans from their parents ($2,079 on average) and nearly 7 percent said they received financial gifts (average amount of $8,220).

Average figures blur the differences between how much high- and low-income families help pay for college.

“The gap is especially large for education related assistance,” he reports.  “While just 11 percent of low-income youth received tuition assistance from their parents, 66 percent of high-income youth did.  And among those who did get help, kids from high-income families received an average of $12,877, compared to $5,788 for those from low-income families.”

Parents tend to reward certain positive characteristics.

…  If parents reported that children age 12 and under were cheerful, self-reliant, and got along well with others, they were more likely to give them financial gifts or loans when they were young adults.

Parents have lowered their expectations about when adulthood should begin.

20120514.COCPewDelayedAdulthood1

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