Posts tagged ‘financial aid award letter’

April 21, 2015

Evaluating college financial aid award letters

by Grace

Among its “tips for deciphering financial-aid letters”, the Wall Street Journal includes information that can be useful in evaluating student loan offers.

Difference between subsidized and unsubsidized federal student loans

The federal government pays interest charges on federally subsidized loans while a student is in school, for example, which can help borrowers substantially. Such loans are generally given to students who demonstrate some kind of financial need, but students don’t need to come from low-income families to qualify.

Just over 34% of undergraduates with family income of at least $100,000 received subsidized Stafford loans at colleges where total annual costs, including tuition and room and board, were at least $30,000 in 2011-12, according to an analysis by Edvisors of the most recent federal data available. Just 12% of such students received the loans when attending less-expensive colleges.

Unsubsidized federal loans can be less desirable because interest accrues while the student is in school, which—if unpaid—could result in a significantly larger balance by the time the student graduates. Some colleges don’t include unsubsidized loans in financial-aid offers.

Colleges and universities also may offer their own loans, which may or not be preferable. Compare and contrast the terms on offer, including the interest rate and when interest charges begin to boost the outstanding balance.

Check out this link for the full article:

Annamaria Andriotis, “How to Play the College Financial-Aid Game”, Wall Street Journal, April 17, 2015.

April 7, 2014

Be careful — your college financial ‘award’ may include loans

by Grace

College financial award letters can sometimes be difficult to decipher.  With the May 1 deadline for fall enrollment decisions fast approaching, families must be careful as they review details about the types of aid listed in these letters.

That number next to the word “financial aid award”? It’s not all a gift This is the single biggest point of confusion, financial aid experts say. There may be a line at the bottom of your letter that reads, “this is your award amount,” and the number next to that phrase could look like a lot of dollars. However, you have to look at the lines above the “total aid award” number to figure out what went into calculating that total – and chances are, there are some loans mixed in. Since loans need to be paid back with interest, these are hardly a “gift.”

This sample award letter shows a $39,000 “award” that “includes “$2,000 you’re expected to earn and another $6,500 you’ll have to pay back”.

20140403.COCFinAwardLetter1

 

What’s worse, Mark Kantrowitz says, you may not be able to quickly tell which items are grants and which are loans. “There’s no interest rate, no monthly payment listed, and they may not use the word loan. They set up a character limit for the name of the award and they use lots of abbreviations. Sometimes they’ll say L or LN instead of using the full word for loan,” he says. So, for instance, you may see “Fed Staff L,” and there may be a “sub” or “unsub” afterwards. This stands for “federal Stafford loan,” a loan that comes from the government and whose current interest rate is 3.9%. “Sub” stands for subsidized, which means the interest does not accrue while you’re in school; “unsub” stands for unsubsidized, which means the interest does accrue while you’re in school so the amount you owe upon graduation will be larger than the amount you borrowed (unless you pay down the interest while you’re in school).

Sometimes loans to parents are included in the award amount.

Stafford loans are loans that go in the student’s name, but parents need to be careful to scan the award letter for the addition of loans that will be in their names, too. Troy Onink, CEO of college planning service Stratagee.com (and a FORBES contributor), says that some schools will even include a Parent Plus loan into the “award” mix. Though this item is just a suggestion — you’re not required to take out a Parent Plus loan, whose interest rate was 6.41% this past academic year and whose 2014-2015 interest rate has not been set yet –some schools include a parental loan to inflate the “award” and make it look better than it is.

Forbes has additional tips for “Decoding College Financial Aid Award Letters.

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