Posts tagged ‘Homeschooling’

November 14, 2014

Homeschooling grows in NYC suburbs

by Grace

Concerned about peer pressure, testing and the Common Core, more parents explore home-schooling.

A Journal News analysis of state data found that Westchester, Rockland and Putnam counties had a 31 percent increase of home-schooled students from 2005 (the earliest the state could provide data for) to 2013. Statewide, more than 20,000 students receive their primary instruction at home.

Westchester County, the one closest to New York City, experienced a 25% growth in homeschoolers.

Concern about Common Core Standards

Sylvia Diaz, coordinator of Tri-State Homeschoolers Association, which caters to home-schoolers in the New York metropolitan area, said she had seen an uptick in inquiries this year from parents concerned about the implementation of the Common Core education standards.

“It has wreaked havoc with a lot of parents, and they say their children are confused and anxious,” said the LaGrangeville resident.

Westchester County homeschoolers
Westchester County, one of the wealthiest and most highly taxed in the country,  is home to many highly regarded public schools.  Most Westchester homeschooling families live in those districts that report lower academic achievement levels.  Many older homeschooled students participate in the abundant selection of classes and activities offered in neighboring New York City.  Yonkers, which borders NYC, is particularly convenient for this purpose.

 

WESTCHESTER COUNTY HOMESCHOOLED STUDENTS, 2012-2013 SCHOOL YEAR

(Click graph to enlarge.)

201411.WestchesterHomeschooled3

 

Numbers for homeschooled students in more New York counties are available at this link.

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Swapna Venugopal Ramaswamy, “Opting out of the classroom: Parents explore home-schooling”, lohud.com, November 10, 2014.

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September 11, 2014

Homeschool is more popular than private school in this state

by Grace

In North Carolina, the number of homeschoolers has now surpassed the number of students attending private schools.

That statistic may seem shocking if you’ve been a stranger to the growth of the homeschooling movement, which has rapidly increased in recent decades.

In 1973, there were approximately 13,000 children, ages 5 to 17, being homeschooled in the United States. But according to the National Center for Education Statistics, as of the 2011-2012 school year, that number has grown to almost 1.8 million or approximately 3.4 percent of the school age population. Other sources report numbers well over 2 million.

Homeschooling has grown 27% over the last two years in North Carolina.

Those are pretty impressive numbers for a movement considered “fringe” not that long ago and that has only been legal in all 50 states since 1996.

The top three reasons parents give for homeschooling their children:

A concern about environment of other schools
A desire to provide moral instruction
A dissatisfaction with academic instruction at other schools

Dissatisfaction with Common Core may be fueling the growth in homeschooling.

And my guess is when the figures are reported related to the past two years you’ll see the number of parents citing “dissatisfaction with academic instruction” spike with the growing uprising against Common Core and national standards. Those who run local homeschooling groups in North Carolina say Common Core is a big factor.

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Genevieve Wood, “In One State, More Children Homeschool Than Attend Private Schools. Why That Shouldn’t Shock You.”, The Daily Signal, September 08, 2014.

September 4, 2012

Survey ranks homeschooling higher than public schools

by Grace

The latest Gallup poll shows Americans rank homeschooling higher than they do public schools.

Public schools get a relatively poor rating, even though the vast majority of American children are educated in public schools. The poll finds 83% of parents with children in grades kindergarten through 12 saying their oldest child attends public school, compared with 9% who say private school, 4% home school, and 2% parochial school. The poll did not assess the percentage of children attending charter schools, a relatively new type of school.

Parents of school-aged children generally rank the various school types in the same order, although they are somewhat more positive about the quality of public school education — 47% say it is excellent or good — than the broader adult population (37%).

While they’re unhappy with schools in general, parents tend like their children’s schools.  Should we blame it on the media?

Americans are much more inclined to believe students in private, parochial, or charter schools receive a high-quality education than to say this about students in public schools and those who are home schooled. Americans in general are not highly satisfied with the state of public schooling in the United States, although that is probably not a commentary on their own child’s school and schools in their local area because Americans have historically been quite satisfied with each of those. Rather, Americans may just have a general sense that U.S. public education is not where it needs to be, perhaps due to news media reports that American students lag behind students in other countries in basic academic skills.

It could be that  media reporting confirms what many people observe in the workplace and elsewhere – poorly educated young people.  Meanwhile, the pervasive negative media reporting on homeschooling does not seem to have affected the public’s views according to this survey.

Confidence in public schools is at a historic low.

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