Posts tagged ‘Public Service Loan Forgiveness Program’

June 13, 2014

President Obama expands the ‘fat-cat MBA tuition assistance program’

by Grace

President Obama’s executive order to expand student loan forgiveness could be called the “fat-cat MBA tuition assistance program”.

Students who got expensive degrees, even of the type that tend to yield lucrative jobs—like MBAs—stand to gain from these changes. At least, certain ones do.

20140611.COCLoanForgivenessMBA1

Jason Delisle of the New America Foundation calculated a scenario where taxpayers would pay $208,259 to forgive part of an MBA graduate’s student loan.

We have one example of someone who might look similar to an MBA student. He starts out with a starting salary of $90,000 and, by the end of 20 years, is making $243,360. Under the old IBR program, he’ll have paid $409,445 by year 25 and be forgiven $23,892 of his loan balance. Under the new [PAYE] plan, he’ll pay less than half of that, or $202,299, and be forgiven $208,259 by year 20.

Better yet, this MBA graduate could start his career in the public sector, and have his loan balance forgiven after ten years under the Public Service Loan Forgiveness Program (PSLFP).

“If you plan on doing any kind of public service, nonprofit or government work,” said Delisle, “then you should borrow as much money as [your school] will possibly let you.”

Here’s an example of a veterinarian who can get taxpayers to pay off a substantial amount of his student loan.

Consider a vet who earns a salary over the next 20 years that is greater than 75 percent of vets in his age group. Once he accumulates $105,000 in debt while in school, any additional amount he borrows is forgiven under the New Income Based Repayment program after 20 years of payments. He could borrow $150,000, $190,000 or more, but he makes the same monthly and total payments over the next 20 years had he borrowed only $105,000….

Here is the kicker. According to the American Veterinary Medical Association, 70 percent of graduates leave school with more than $105,000 in debt today. And remember, the point at which a vet student stops incurring a cost for borrowing more in federal loans – $105,000 – was calculated for high earning vets, those making more than 75 percent of their peers, not the average.

Sweet deal.

Related:

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Cory Weinberg, “What Obama’s Plan to Lighten Loan Burdens Means For MBAs”, BloombergBusinessweek, June 10, 2014.

Karen Weise, “Grad Students Could Win Big as Obama Slashes Debt Payments”,  BloombergBusinessweek, June 9, 2014.

Jason Delisle & Alex Holt, “Income Based Repayment Is One Sick Puppy”, New America Foundation, August 28, 2013.

November 5, 2013

Student loan forgiveness for government employees

by Grace

Here’s the plea from a government employee.

I Work for HHS and Want to Get My Student Loans Forgiven

Steve Rhode, the Get Out of Debt Guy, responds in the Huffington Post that the writer may qualify for a loan forgiveness program.

… certain public service employees can get a substantial discharge of their federal student loans under the Public Service Loan Forgiveness Program (PSLFP)….

Many employers qualify as “public service” employers under the PSLFP.

Qualifying employment is any employment with a federal, state, or local government agency, entity, or organization or a not-for-profit organization that has been designated as tax-exempt by the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) under Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code (IRC). The type or nature of employment with the organization does not matter for PSLF purposes. Additionally, the type of services that these public service organizations provide does not matter for PSLF purposes.

A private not-for-profit employer that is not a tax-exempt organization under Section 501(c)(3) of the IRC may be a qualifying public service organization if it provides certain specified public services. These services include emergency management, military service, public safety, or law enforcement services; public health services; public education or public library services; school library and other school-based services; public interest law services; early childhood education; public service for individuals with disabilities and the elderly. The organization must not be a labor union or a partisan political organization.

Jason Delisle, director of the Federal Education Budget Project at the New America Foundation, advises college graduates to take advantage of this benefit.

“If you plan on doing any kind of public service, nonprofit or government work,” said Delisle, “then you should borrow as much money as [your school] will possibly let you.”

Taxpayers are picking up the tab, which can be substantial.

Under the New IBR, a student who owes $70,000 upon graduation would end up paying back only $22,000 if he stayed ten years at a government job with a starting salary of $40,000.  That’s a savings of $143,000 compared to how much that graduate would have paid had he not taken the IBR option.

Related:  Income Based Repayment (IBR) is a ‘moral hazard’ for high-income student loan borrowers (Cost of College)

August 29, 2013

A checklist before you take out a student loan

by Grace

From the Wall Street Journal comes 5 Things to Know Before Taking Out a Student Loan

1. Research what aid is available to you—including scholarships, state and federal grants, and then federal loans. Meet with your school’s financial-aid counselor to learn these options. Visit the government’s website. The private website http://www.Finaid.org also has good resources.

2. Know the terms of your loans. What is the interest rate, what is the repayment period, and when precisely will payments begin? More importantly, find out what your expected monthly payment will be upon graduation….

3. Once you take out loans, be aware that this debt will not go away until you pay it. Federal loans are often called “aid,” but they are not grants—they must be repaid. Also, it is extremely difficult to discharge student loans—federal or private—through bankruptcy….

4. Look up information on your institution. Don’t just find out your school’s overall ranking or graduation rate. Also look up its “three-year cohort default rate,” a figure intended to show how many students pay back their loans within three years of graduation. That reflects how many students from that school are finding work and decent pay. Information on your school, including default data, can be found here.

5. Look up the earnings potential of your major. This website has information on different careers, including average salaries. Consider whether your debt load is too high relative to the expected earnings of your chosen field.

Also check out loan forgiveness options.

I’ll add another item to this list.  Be sure to research the most recent federal student loan relief programs that reduce loan payments based on a percentage of income, subsidize interest charges, and forgive loan balances after 25, 20, or 10 years.

Income-Based Repayment Plan (IBR)
“… a repayment plan for the major types of federal student loans that caps your required monthly payment at an amount intended to be affordable based on your income and family size.”

Public Service Loan Forgiveness Program
“Under this program, borrowers may qualify for forgiveness of the remaining balance of their Direct Loans after they have made 120 qualifying payments on those loans while employed full time by certain public service employers.”

Keep in mind that these taxpayer-funded programs are expected to benefit higher-income borrowers the most while offering only marginal assistance to low-income borrowers.

 “If you are high-income and have a lot of debt, this is a huge giveaway.”

And some advice from Glenn Reynolds:

There are a few circumstances where student loans may be justified, but they should be viewed with extreme distrust.

Related:  Not enough borrowers take advantage of Income Based Repayment’s ‘mind-boggling’ generous benefits (Cost of College)

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