Posts tagged ‘Yale University’

May 7, 2013

‘Rich’ families get a sweet financial aid deal at the most selective universities

by Grace

For students who win the college admissions lottery and get in to the most selective universities, high income may not be a barrier to receiving financial aid.  Here are some examples.

HARVARD

2011-12 School Year:  About 240 families earning $180,000-200,00 received financial aid.

Beginning with the Class of 2016, families with incomes between $65,000 and $150,000 will contribute from zero to ten percent of income, and those with incomes above $150,000 will be asked to pay proportionately more than 10%, based on their individual circumstances. Families at all income levels who have significant assets will continue to pay more than those in less fortunate circumstances.

PRINCETON

2011-12 School Year:  99% of families earning $180,000-200,000 who applied for financial aid received grants that averaged $23,600.

Applicants receive aid based on their families’ financial need. We do not use income cutoffs when determining whether to award aid.  Any student whose family feels unable to afford the full cost of attendance is encouraged to apply for aid.

YALE

2011-12 School Year:  99% of families earning $150-200,00 who applied for financial aid were approved.  Grants for those 505 families averaged $26,500 each.

  • Families whose total gross income is less than $65,000 are not expected to make any financial contribution towards their child’s Yale education. 100% of the student’s total cost of attendance will be financed with a Yale Financial Aid Award.
  • Families earning between $65,000 and $200,000 (with typical assets) annually contribute a percentage of their yearly income towards their child’s Yale education, on a sliding scale that begins at 1% just above $65,000 and moves toward 20% at the $200,000 level.
  • There is no strict income cutoff for financial aid awards. Many families with over $200,000 in annual income receive need-based aid from Yale.

UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO

2012-13 School Year:  59% of families with incomes above $120,000 who applied received financial aid.

The average University of Chicago aid applicant receives $37,500 in scholarships each year.

$160,000 income puts you in the top 10% of families in the United States.

Related:

February 1, 2012

Only two of the top ten universities give out merit scholarships

by Grace

While all the top ten ranked universities offer generous need-based financial aid, only two – University of Chicago and Duke – award merit scholarships.

First, here are the top ten universities as ranked by US News & World Report.

#1         Harvard University
#1         Princeton University
#3         Yale University
#4         Columbia University
#5         California Institute of Technology
#5         Massachusetts Institute of Technology
#5         Stanford University
#5         University of Chicago
#5         University of Pennsylvania
#10       Duke University


Chicago offers less aid to more students

Chicago awards merit aid to about 10% of its freshman, averaging about $8,000 per recipient.  Here is the description from their website:

Merit awards are determined by the Office of College Admissions regardless of financial need and are guaranteed for four years of undergraduate study. They include the following:

  • University Scholarship: Partial scholarships ranging from $5,000 to $15,000, renewable for four years
  • Chicago Public Schools Scholarship: A full-tuition scholarship to selected students who have graduated from a Chicago Public Schools high school
  • Police and Fire Scholarship: A full-tuition scholarship to selected students who are sons or daughters of active-duty Chicago police officers or firefighters
  • The University also honors National Merit Finalists with a renewable award of $1,000 to $2,000.


Duke offers more aid to fewer students

Duke gives merit aid to about 3% of its freshman, averaging about $25,000 per recipient according to US News reporting.  This excludes their athletic scholarships.  More information is available at their website, but you have to wade through the details to learn that some of these “merit” scholarships actually have a need component.  (I’ll write about this messy detail in a future post.)


Scholarship information for both schools from USNWR, based on 2010 data

University of Chicago Non-need-based Scholarships/Grants  
Average non-need-based scholarship or grant award (freshmen) $7,772
Average non-need-based athletic scholarship or grant award (freshmen) $0
Average non-need-based scholarship or grant award (undergraduates) $12,854
Average non-need-based athletic scholarship or grant award (undergraduates) $0
… 
Duke Non-need-based Scholarships/Grants  
Average non-need-based scholarship or grant award (freshmen) $24,985
Average non-need-based athletic scholarship or grant award (freshmen) $39,470
Average non-need-based scholarship or grant award (undergraduates) $21,158
Average non-need-based athletic scholarship or grant award (undergraduates) $38,398
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