Archive for February, 2014

February 28, 2014

‘We have 500 cable channels and a one-size-fits all school system’

by Grace

Joe Trippi, a longtime Democratic political strategist. has been a proponent of school choice ever since he was a kindergartener and his mother fought to allow him to attend a safer school outside his neighborhood.

Trippi was recently interviewed by Reason.tv at a National School Choice Week event.

“… The status quo is not working.  Let’s put everybody’s ideas on the table.  If you’re in support of current public school system the way it is let’s talk about it, but I don’t think it’s working….

The reason for School Choice Week is because technology is moving so fast that most government bureaucracies can’t keep up with it.  One of them is education….

We have 500 cable channels and a one-size-fits all school system.”

Not having school choice has “been wrong for 50 years”.

“…  we have more choice at a 7-Eleven them in the way we educate our children. That’s crazy….”

School choice is becoming more of a bipartisan movement.

Democrats and school choice have a long, tangled relationship. Few know better than Trippi. He’s been deep inside Democratic politics since the 1970s, and his firm, Trippi & Associates, has advised National School Choice Week since its inception in 2010. So what’s he seeing on the ground now? A lot of Democrats coming around on school choice, especially at the local level, especially in inner cities.

Along with the trend of increased support for school choice, Trippi sees a libertarian president in the near future.

… Four important changes in American politics are creating this opportunity: a socially tolerant public, the effective end of the two-party system, disruptive technologies, and the growing popularity of politicians such as Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.).

“The younger generation is probably the most libertarian and sort of tolerant, and has more libertarian values, I’d say, than any generation in American history” …

Related:

February 27, 2014

Ready or not, K-12 is moving to increased online instruction

by Grace

It can be argued that K-12 online instruction in and of itself is no better or worse than traditional teaching.  Sometimes it works well, and sometimes it fails miserably.

In any case, the education industry is eagerly embracing online methods in yet another attempt to “innovate” K-12 education.

 … by the year 2019 half of all classes for grades K-12 will be taught online.

That’s the prediction from Clayton Christensen, author of Disrupting Class: How Disruptive Innovation Will Transform the Way the World Learns.  I will not be surprised to see this come true.

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There is very little good research on K-12 online learning.

… the results of meta-analyses of K-12 studies do not show a decided edge for students taking online courses or in virtual full-time schools performing even marginally above students who are in teacher-led classrooms.  More striking, however, is that only a few studies of virtual instruction in K-12 schools meet the minimum quality threshold for design, sampling, and methodologies….

Online instruction fills a need and is effective for some K-12 students.

“Some kids don’t have the discipline to sit down at a computer every day and do schoolwork with no one looking over their shoulder. … But for the right kid, the online approach offers benefits that traditional school doesn’t.”

Those benefits include flexibility and efficiency. Taking all or a few classes online gives students more opportunities than ever before. They have more opportunities to work while in school, gaining valuable job experience that economists show increases their ability to move up the ladder later in life. They can chase serious interests like athletics, music, or volunteering, and spend more time in the real world than preparing for it.

Any combination of lousy administration, inept teachers, and poor curriculum will produce poor results whether online or traditional methods are used.

Here are letters from Manhattan’s Murry Bergtraum high school students defending their fraudulent blended-learning program where one “social-studies teacher had a roster of 475 students in all grades and subjects”.

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A junior wrote that the program “made it less challenging and more understandable. We watched a video, answer a few questions, and took an online quiz/test. It was simple, and reasonable.” This helped him score 85 in chemistry, he said.

But professors at CUNY — where nearly 80 percent of New York City grads who attend must take remedial classes in math, reading or writing — said online instruction often leaves students ill-prepared.

No kidding.

February 26, 2014

Growing student debt may be a reason for weak housing market

by Grace

A recent headline from the Washington Post highlights the problem of how growing student debt may be hampering an economic recovery.

Student debt may hurt housing recovery by hampering first-time buyers

The share of 25-year olds who have student loans is now at almost 50%, with an average loan balance of over $20,000.  Instead of saving money for a down payment to buy a house, many of these young people must prioritize paying down their student loans.

The money going into paying down student loans is not going into saving for a down payment.

First-time buyers, the bedrock of the housing market, are not stepping up to fill the void. They have accounted for nearly a third of home purchases over the past year, well below the historical norm, industry figures show. The trend has alarmed some housing experts, who suspect that student loan debt is partly to blame. That debt has tripled from a decade earlier, to more than $1 trillion, while wages for young college graduates have dropped.

The fear is that many young adults can no longer save for a down payment or qualify for a mortgage, impeding the housing market and the overall economy, which relies heavily on the housing sector for growth, regulators and mortgage industry experts said.

Recent changes place greater restrictions on the debt-to-income ratio allowed for mortgages.

Federal rules that took effect last month grant mortgage lenders broad legal protections as long as they do not approve loans for prospective buyers whose total monthly debt exceeds 43 percent of their monthly gross income. The overarching goal is to protect borrowers against lender abuses.

Most who struggled to buy their first home blame student loans.

Of the 20 percent of first-time buyers who said it was difficult to save for a down payment, 54 percent said student loans made it tough to save money, according to a recent survey by the National Association of Realtors. About half of the people polled in another of the group’s surveys said student debt was a “huge” obstacle to buying a home.

On the other hand, my anecdotal information tells me that a reluctance to be tied down to one location may also be an important factor in why young people are reluctant to buy homes.

Related:  Amid declining household debt, rising student loans remain a drag on the economy (Cost of College)

February 25, 2014

Back to basics on understanding the Expected Financial Contribution

by Grace

In the process of determining your family’s eligibility for college financial aid, it is important to understand exactly what the Expected Financial Contribution (EFC) is, and what it is not.

Here is a good explanation from Troy Onink in Forbes.

Calculating Your Expected Family Contribution (EFC)

Regardless of the aid form(s) the student is required to complete and submit as part of the process of applying for financial aid, and after all of the time and information it takes to complete the form(s), it all boils down to three letters, EFC, which stands for expected family contribution. You provide your financial information on the aid forms (FAFSA and CSS Profile), submit the forms online to the processing centers for each respective form, and the information from the forms goes into the aid calculations (the Federal Methodology, Institutional Methodology and Consensus Methodology).

The output of those need analysis calculations is the student’s expected family contribution (EFC) toward the cost of college. The student’s EFC is the minimum amount the student is expected to contribute toward the cost of college. Thus, EFC represents a dollar amount. It is the “output” of the aid forms and calculations. Your data goes in and your child’s EFC comes out and goes to the colleges’ aid departments that the child asks the data to be sent to on the aid forms. All three of the EFC formulas focus primarily on the assets and income of the parents and student, family size and the number of dependent children enrolled in college in a given year to assess the family’s ability to pay for college using the income and assets that they have. And because the three formulas calculate EFC differently, it’s likely that the student’s EFC under each formula will also be different.

As a general rule, the lower the EFC the higher the financial need and therefore the higher the chance of qualifying for financial aid.

From the FAFSA site comes this clarification:

Your EFC is not the amount of money your family will have to pay for college nor is it the amount of federal student aid you will receive….

Related:

February 24, 2014

You can get a college degree for almost free

by Grace

This college degree may not be prestigious, but it’s truly affordable.  Tuition is free, although each proctored exam costs $100.

Just in time for its first graduates, the University of the People, a tuition-free four-year-old online institution built to reach underserved students around the world, announced Thursday that it had received accreditation.

The University of the People currently offers degrees in business administration and computer science.  Present enrollment is 700 students, but with newly acquired accreditation that number is expected to grow to 5,000 students by 2016.

It appears that real learning is taking place.

Classes at the university are 10 weeks long, and have 20 to 30 students — often from as many different countries — who have weekly homework and quizzes. The university depends largely on volunteer labor.  Mr. Reshef said some 3,000 professors have offered to volunteer, although so far the university has only been able to use about 100 of them.

Its deans are volunteers from New York University and Columbia.

The school was created by Israeli entrepreneur Shai Reshef, who has been able to attract the attention of some big guns in the realm of higher education.

The University of the People, almost from the start, has attracted high-level support, with partnerships or backing from New York University, the Clinton Global Initiative, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the OpenCourseWare Consortium and many others. In August, Microsoft agreed to provide scholarships, mentoring and job opportunities to 1,000 African students who enroll at the University of the People.

I’m reminded of this:

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Related:

February 22, 2014

ICYMI — Weekly roundup February 22, 2014

by Grace

20131220.COCICYMI1

THIS PAST WEEK ON COST OF COLLEGE:

More high school students are taking AP exams, but the passing rate is lower

Cost of College seminar in New York on February 25, 2014

New York State may offer free tuition to top students who choose to major in STEM fields

Recent college graduates suffering worst unemployment rates in 50 years

The War on Poverty has been a ”success at strengthening the social safety net” but a “failure as an engine of self-improvement”

“Do You Read Fast Enough To Be Successful?”

February 21, 2014

How fast do you read?

by Grace

Do You Read Fast Enough To Be Successful?

That’s the question posed by Brett Nelson in Forbes.  He sees a link between speedy reading and success.

The most successful people I know don’t just read—they inhale information.

Average reading speeds:

Average adult:  300 WPM
Average college student:  450 WPM
High-level executive:  575 WPM
High-scoring college student:  800 WPM
Speed readers:  1500 WPM

Staples has on online test you can take to get a sense of your reading speed.  It seems a bit flawed because it only includes a very short passage.  Wouldn’t a lengthier test be more accurate?  I believe I read faster after a few minutes as I get into the groove of a book.

I took the test and the results showed I’m a relatively slow reader.  Most of my reading these days is on the Internet, and I’ve developed a habit of skimming that does not lend itself to deep comprehension.

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I’m informed that if I kept up this pace, I could finish War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy in 27 hours and 7 minutes.

Confession:  This was my second try at the test after my first attempt put me even closer to the average reading level.  I’m embarrassed to be average.

I invite you to try the test and post your results in the comments.  Click the image to go to the test.

ereader test
Source: Staples eReader Department

Related:  Using the Internet is ‘supereasy’, but ‘deep reading, advanced math, scientific reasoning’ is hard (Cost of College)

February 20, 2014

‘The War on Poverty became the welfare state.’

by Grace

Robert Samuelson writes that the War on Poverty has been a “success at strengthening the social safety net” but a “failure as an engine of self-improvement”.

The War on Poverty is often branded a failure because the share of Americans below the official poverty line has barely budged. In 1982, at the end of a harsh recession, it was 15 percent. In 2010, after the Great Recession, it was 15 percent.

The trouble is that the official poverty rate is a lousy indicator of people’s material well-being. It misses all that the poor get — their total consumption. It counts cash transfers from government but not non-cash transfers (food stamps, school lunches) and tax refunds under the EITC. Some income is under-reported; also, the official poverty line overstates price increases and, therefore, understates purchasing power.

Based on material well-being, the poverty rate is actually only about 5%.

Eliminating these defects, economists Bruce Meyer of the University of Chicago and James Sullivan of the University of Notre Dame built a consumption-based index that estimates the 2010 poverty rate at about 5 percent.

People at the bottom aren’t well-off, but they’re better off than they once were. Among the official poor, half have computers, 43 percent have central air conditioning and 36 percent have dishwashers, report Meyer and Sullivan. These advances are especially impressive because the massive immigration of unskilled Hispanic workers inflated the ranks of the poor. From 1990 to 2007, all the increase in official poverty was among Hispanics.

But LBJ’s vision of “a hand up, not a handout” failed miserably.

… America remains a tiered society with millions at the bottom still living more chaotic and vulnerable lives. Government’s capacity to boost them into the mainstream was oversold. Although Head Start produces some gains for 3- and 4-year-olds, improvements dissipate quickly; one study found most disappeared by third grade. Schools are continually “reformed,” because they don’t produce better results.

The War on Poverty became the welfare state.

Marriage trends point to a gloomy outlook.

Worse, the breakdown of marriage and spread of single-parent households suggest that poverty may grow.

From 1963 to 2012, the share of families with children under 18 headed by a single parent tripled to 32 percent. It’s 26 percent among whites, 34 percent among Hispanics and 59 percent among African-Americans. Just why is murky. Low-income men may flunk as attractive marriage mates. Or, “women can live independently more easily rather than put up with less satisfactory marriages,” as Brookings’ Isabel Sawhill says. Regardless of the causes and despite many exceptions, children in single-parent households face a harder future. They’re more likely to drop out of school, get pregnant before age 20 or be unemployed.

Poverty becomes self-perpetuating.

Handing out money is the easy part.

The War on Poverty’s success at strengthening the social safety net — a boon in the Great Recession — should not obscure its failure as an engine of self-improvement. Government is fairly good at handing out money; it’s less good at changing behavior. The two roles intersect. If the safety net is too generous, it will weaken work incentives. If it’s too stingy, it will condone suffering. This tale of two wars has left the fight against poverty in a costly and unsatisfying stalemate.

Related:

February 19, 2014

Recent college graduates suffering worst unemployment rates in 50 years

by Grace

Millennials of all education levels are suffering the worst unemployment in 50 years.

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Whatever the claims that millennials are an entitled generation, it’s clear they are facing employment challenges more difficult than their parents did.  They are also facing the twin problems of unprecedented rising debt and falling wages.

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Related:

February 18, 2014

Free tuition at New York state universities for top STEM students?

by Grace

The proposed New York State budget includes a provision to offer free tuition to top students who choose to major in STEM fields.

“New this year under the governor’s budget proposal, some students at the top of their classes will have a chance to skip tuition payments entirely. Those who plan to major in a field related to the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) subjects would receive free tuition to any SUNY or CUNY institution, as long as they remain in the state for five years after graduation to pursue their careers. The $8 million budget line is intended to help reverse the “brain drain” of the best and brightest from New York State.”

Students must graduate in the top ten percent of their high school class to qualify for the scholarships.

Details must be worked out.

Final budget approval is expected this spring.  Questions have been raised about how the requirement to stay in the state for five years after graduation would affect students who wish to attend graduate school.  One estimate predicts funding is only sufficient for 166 four-year scholarships, so it is possible that demand will be greater than supply.

Related:

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